Social Repayment

Micro-Tasking and Social Repayment
Through strategic partnerships worldwide, Pocket Money provides Borrowers with sponsored micro tasks, that are rewarded in digital currencies, which can help Borrowers to repay their PocketMoney loans.

Average loan size in emerging markets

Uganda

USD 329

Sri Lanka

USD 377

Philippines

USD 204

Vietnam

USD 689

Indonesia

USD 140

Myanmar

USD 305

Bangladesh

USD 60

India

USD 378

Pakistan

USD 380

Mongolia

USD 856

Rwanda

USD 382

Tanzania

USD 340

Malawi

USD 220

Zambia

USD 542

DR Congo

USD 507

Ghana

USD 302

Senegal

USD 315

Mali

USD 367

Kenya

USD 569
  • Uganda

    USD 329
  • Sri Lanka

    USD 377
  • Philippines

    USD 204
  • Vietnam

    USD 689
  • Indonesia

    USD 140
  • Myanmar

    USD 305
  • Bangladesh

    USD 60
  • India

    USD 378
  • Pakistan

    USD 380
  • Mongolia

    USD 856
  • Rwanda

    USD 382
  • Tanzania

    USD 340
  • Malawi

    USD 220
  • Zambia

    USD 542
  • DR Congo

    USD 507
  • Ghana

    USD 302
  • Senegal

    USD 315
  • Mali

    USD 367
  • Kenya

    USD 569

5 things you need to know before getting a small loan

Informative article on Medium
Pocket Money Wallet Cash

A small personal loan can be a quick, convenient option to pay an immediate expense, like a medical bill or car repair, if you don’t have emergency savings or alternative ways to cover the expense. Here are 5 things to know before you take out a loan, so you know if it’s the right decision for you.

  1. Why you need the money?
  2. How much you can afford to borrow and payback
  3. Interest rates and other fees
  4. Small loans can be a lifesaver when you need cash quickly
  5. Banks aren’t the only option

The gap between stats and reality

Informative article on Medium
Financial Inclusion

Over the last two centuries, free markets and globalization have had a positive effect on aggregate economic growth, contributing to better living conditions and the reduction of extreme poverty across the world. Yet this is far from the only important socioeconomic change and moreover, the last two centuries have not been all about ‘free-market capitalism’.

Based on current projections, the world will not end poverty by 2030. Poverty will likely be lower by about 200 million people, but 438 million people, or 5 percent of the world’s population, will still live in extreme poverty. This is because there is a high likelihood that the pace of poverty reduction will slow down markedly in the coming years.